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2007 Dow's - Vintage Port

PORTUGAL / PORTO/DOURO /
abv 20.0%
  • 94 WA
  • 100 WS
  • 90 JR
  • Variety
    Port Blend
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SKU: 49507-2016-1500-3A
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 100

    Amazing aromas of lilac, violet, crushed blueberry and mineral that turn to black pepper and spices follow through to a full-bodied, medium-sweet palate, with a long, chewy finish. Evolves to tar and asphalt. Really held back, yet powerful grip slaps youA?A¨and makes you happy. This is mind-blowing in texture. The greatest Dow ever made.
    Author: James Suckling
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 94

    The 2007 Dow's Vintage Port is one of the stars of the vintage. A glass-coating opaque purple color, it offers up an already complex bouquet of mineral, pencil lead, licorice, spice box, and assorted black fruits. On the palate it is quite massive, slightly dry in the house style, and packed with fruit. It has the structure to be one of the long distance runners of the vintage taking as much as 20 years to reach its peak and drinking well through 2050. As an aside, I was able to taste the individual components of this wine on the day prior to this tasting. The final blend is better than any of its parts.
    Author: Jay Miller
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 18

    Very dark and brooding to look at. Dry and complex with some notes of vegetation on the nose. Really rather polished and superior. Masses of extract, not an awful lot of sugar, but refinement and breed. If it were a person it would definitely be a man. In a pin striped suit (as this taster is today, funnily enough). Clean peppermint finish.
    Author: Jancis Robinson
  • Self | Rating: 10

    Author: Musubi
  • Self | Rating: 98

    So thick and rich unlike any port I've ever had - did a short decant. Few things I've had were this powerful but I'm thinking it's still restrained. The alcohol was very well hidden fruit just gliding over the palate, not a rough edge in site.
    Drink Dates: 2011-2041
    Author: Rossboss
From his new home in London, Bruno da Silva began importing wine to England from his native Portugal in 1789, thus beginning Dow's long history as a Port house. Through the challenges of sea transport and periodic war, da Silva maintained his successful business and passed it on to his son and then grandson, who joined with Frederick William Cosens, and later George Acheson Warre in forming Silva & Cosens. This firm merged with Dow & Co, another successful Port house, in 1877 and adopted Dow's as the brand name for the new partnership, which quickly solidified its reputation among the best in the Port trade. The next step for the business was investment in the vineyards of the Douro, a move that would prove extremely rewarding in the future, as they had chosen the finest areas in the valley. The vineyards Senhora da Ribeira, purchased in 1890, and Quinta do Bomfim, purchased in 1896, form the foundation for Dow's great vintage ports. The Symingon family, which now owns Dow's, privately holds two other vineyards, Quinta do Santinho and Quinta da Cerdeira. These four vineyards together total over 90 hectares.

Port-making at Dow's is done in a traditional manner. A portion of the grapes are tread by foot in stone lagares, and the rest by a revolutionary automated treading machine. Because fermentations are cut short by the necessary addition of grape spirit to the juice, it is essential to maximize skin to juice contact in the first few days of fermentation; the robotic treading machine does just that, producing wines that hold to Dow's stellar reputation.

Discover the very best wines from the top producers in this region.

The Douro—the port-producing region of Portugal—has a warm continental climate, though weather patterns year over year vary significantly. Growers need to manage frost and heavy rainfall in the spring, followed by high temperatures and drought conditions throughout the growing season. As in Champagne, blending across varieties and vintages is the only way for port producers to maintain consistency in their style over time, and in the best years a vintage is declared.

Port blends are composed of many indigenous varieties, all with thick skin, high tannin, and black fruit and floral aromas. The most important varieties for the best-quality wines are Touriga Franca, Tinta Roriz, Tinta Barroca, Touriga Nacional, and Tinta Cão. Port blends are fortified by the addition of a neutral spirit before fermentation ends, raising the alcohol level to approximately 20% abv and leaving behind residual sugar. The best examples are extremely concentrated with grippy tannins and can age for decades in bottle. Look to the houses of Taylor Fladgate, Fonseca, and Quinta do Noval for some of the best-quality wines.

The perfect port pairing varies based on style. Late-bottled vintage (LBV) ports pair best with cheese and chocolate. The concentrated flavor profile and high tannin of vintage ports match well with buttery and tangy flavors, including the classic Stilton blue cheese pairing, dark chocolate, figs, and walnut. Oxidized tawny port lacks fruit and displays aromas of nuts, dried apricots, toffee, and caramel. It pairs naturally with nut-forward dishes such as pecan pie, biscotti, pies and crème brûlée.

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 754 bottles owned
  • 164 collectors
  • Average collector rating: 99
    (Out of 164 collectors)