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2015 Faiveley - Corton Clos des Cortons Faiveley

FRANCE / BURGUNDY / CORTON
  • 18 JR
  • 96 JS
  • Variety
    Pinot Noir
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SKU: 48378-2015-1500-3A
  • Rating: 17

    Cask sample. Monopole. Mid to deep crimson. So perfumed you might even say there was a lightly floral quality to the red fruit. Compact and yet scented on the palate too. Surprisingly approachable but the tannins close in on the finish. (JH)
    Author: Julia Harding MW
  • Rating: 96

    Fantastic aromas of crushed berries and blueberries plus hints of rose petals and mushrooms. Floral, too. Full-bodied and so and velvety with tannins that show polish and finesse. Superb potential here.
    Author: James Suckling
  • Rating: 96

    This too is extremely ripe yet manages to avoid any sense of surmaturite on the once again liqueur-like aromas of black cherry, cassis, anise and lilac scents. This is a massive wine, with simply huge mid-palate concentration, power and muscle that terminates just like the Rodin in a borderline painfully intense finale that both coats the palate and lasts for minutes. I take considerable pains to point out however that this ultra-structured and overtly austere effort is not only built for the long haul but for the very long haul. I have suggested an initial drinking window of 25 years from now but it may very well be 30 to 40. In sum, this is very old school Corton.
    Author: Allen Meadows
  • Rating: 97

    (entirely destemmed, as these thick-skinned grapes were extremely high in tannins and total polyphenols): Saturated dark red-ruby. Distinctly dark aromas of black cherry, licorice and violet convey an impression of medicinal reserve. Powerful black cherry, crunchy raspberry and licorice flavors boast remarkable intensity and energy but come across as less austere at this stage than normal. A huge wine with the structure for a 25-year evolution in bottle but there's something almost feminine about its fine-grained texture. The major tannins are totally supported by fruit on the classic, penetrating, extremely long aftertaste. A great wine in the making. (Erwan Faiveley noted that this was the most impressive must he's ever tasted.) The IPT (indice polyphenols totaux) here is a whopping 90, compared to a normal 50, according to Jerome Flous, who added that the record for this cuvAce was 103 in 2005. - Stephen Tanzer
  • Self | Rating: 94

    Red Currant, Cranberry, Blueberry, Plum, Cherry, Forest Floor, Mushroom, Lead pencil, Espresso, Smokey, Cinnamon, Clove, Violet, Herbs de provence, Silky texture, Long finish
    Author: Roher Maximilian
Domaine Faively began in 1825 as a classic negociant firm and has since been passed down from father to son for nearly 200 years. During this time, it has become the largest owner of classified vineyards in the Cote de Nuits, Cote de Beanue and Cotes Chalonnaise. With 10 hectares of Grand Crus and 25 hectares of Premier Crus, including several monopoles, Faiveley is not only one of the largest producers in Burgundy, but also one of the finest estates in the world.

Today led by Erwan Faiveley, the Nuits-Saint-Georges-based operation is looking to expand the domaine's holdings of exceptional vineyards to ensure more control from vine to bottle across the entire portfolio. Faiveley's top wines are hand-bottled with no filtration, resulting in wines described by Clive Coates as "...supremely clean and elegant: definitive examples of Pinot Noir... above all they have richness and breed, the thumbprint of a master winemaker."

Burgundy is home to some of the greatest and most expensive wines in the world. Stretching from Auxerre in the north to Lyon in the south, the region's most famous section is the limestone-rich Côte d'Or. Vineyards in Burgundy are classified according to their locations on the hillsides. Only 2% of total production is from grand cru sites, while premier cru and village-level wines are more common. It is rare for one domaine to own an entire vineyard; rather the land has been divided down to individual rows, in some cases as a result of inheritance laws. While other varieties can be found in Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay reign supreme. The best examples are capable of aging for 15 years or more, a rarity for these two varieties, making them highly valuable. 

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 27 bottles owned
  • 2 collectors
  • Average collector rating: 94
    (Out of 2 collectors)