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2015 Faiveley - Corton-Charlemagne

FRANCE / BURGUNDY / CORTON
  • 93 WS
  • Variety
    Chardonnay
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SKU: 48551-2015-750-3A
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 93

    A good dose of smoky new oak offsets the vibrant structure and stony apple notes in this intense white. Remains tightly wound and long, with the flavors persisting on the finish. Well-balanced from start to finish. Best from 2019 through 2029. 46 cases imported.
    Author: Bruce Sanderson
  • Self | Rating: 93

    Grapefruit, Lemon, Orange, Apple, Pear, Guava, Banana, Light toast, Coconut, Ginger, Acacia, Orange blossom, Medium/Full bodied, Coarse texture, Long finish
    Author: Roher Maximilian
Domaine Faively began in 1825 as a classic negociant firm and has since been passed down from father to son for nearly 200 years. During this time, it has become the largest owner of classified vineyards in the Cote de Nuits, Cote de Beanue and Cotes Chalonnaise. With 10 hectares of Grand Crus and 25 hectares of Premier Crus, including several monopoles, Faiveley is not only one of the largest producers in Burgundy, but also one of the finest estates in the world.

Today led by Erwan Faiveley, the Nuits-Saint-Georges-based operation is looking to expand the domaine's holdings of exceptional vineyards to ensure more control from vine to bottle across the entire portfolio. Faiveley's top wines are hand-bottled with no filtration, resulting in wines described by Clive Coates as "...supremely clean and elegant: definitive examples of Pinot Noir... above all they have richness and breed, the thumbprint of a master winemaker."

Burgundy is home to some of the greatest and most expensive wines in the world. Stretching from Auxerre in the north to Lyon in the south, the region's most famous section is the limestone-rich Côte d'Or. Vineyards in Burgundy are classified according to their locations on the hillsides. Only 2% of total production is from grand cru sites, while premier cru and village-level wines are more common. It is rare for one domaine to own an entire vineyard; rather the land has been divided down to individual rows, in some cases as a result of inheritance laws. While other varieties can be found in Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay reign supreme. The best examples are capable of aging for 15 years or more, a rarity for these two varieties, making them highly valuable. 

Chardonnay is a versatile variety that can grow in a wide range of climates, and its neutral flavor profile offers a blank canvas for winemakers to impart their style. In cool climates, Chardonnay displays flavors of green fruit and citrus. As the climate becomes more moderate, flavors of white peach and melon develop. In warm and hot climates, aromas of banana, pineapple, and other tropical fruit are common.

The best Old-World Chardonnay comes from Burgundy, where it is uniquely reflective of terroir and can express many different flavor profiles even within this relatively small region. In Chablis, the northernmost part of Burgundy, wines are often unoaked and known for their minerality, high acidity, and aromas of green apple, citrus, wet stone, and slate. In the Côte de Beaune, further south, wines are typically aged in neutral French oak and have flavors of stone fruit, toast, almond, and cream. Burgundian producers pioneered the techniques that are now associated with high-quality Chardonnay around the world, including barrel fermentation, barrel ageing, malolactic fermentation, and maturation on lees. The best wines, from producers like Domaine Leflaive, Bouchard Père & Fils, and Domaine William Fèvre, can age in the bottle for a decade or more, developing complex aromas of nuts and mushroom.

New-World Chardonnay tends to grow in warmer climates than in the Old World, producing wines that are full-bodied, high in alcohol, and low in acidity. Use of American oak imparts flavors of vanilla, clove, hazelnut, butter, and caramel on top of peach and banana fruit. Look to Californian producers in Napa and Sonoma, including Kistler, Peter Michael, and Aubert, for the highest-quality versions of this New-World style.

Chardonnay’s versatility makes it a great option for pairing. High-acid wines from Chablis are the perfect accompaniment to oysters or clams, while oak-forward Napa wines are the best match for buttery lobster. Halibut, cod, and chicken breast are classic pairings with white Burgundy. 

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 21 bottles owned
  • 4 collectors
  • Average collector rating: 93
    (Out of 4 collectors)