• Home
  • 2014 Ponsot - Corton-Charlemagne

2014 Ponsot - Corton-Charlemagne

FRANCE / BURGUNDY / CORTON
  • 94 WA
  • 17 JR
  • Variety
    Chardonnay
In stock|Sold out

Out of stock

learn more about producers & collectors

SKU: 372489-2014-750-1A
  • Burghound | Rating: 93

    A well-layered nose offers up notes of various citrus element, apple, pear, white flowers and plenty of wet stone nuances. The attractively textured, powerful and intense big-bodied flavors possess ample minerality before culminating in a beautifully long and well-balanced finish. This moderately forward effort should repay mid-term cellaring.
    Author: Allen Meadows
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 16

    Muted nose. The lightest of almonds on the nose. Pretty lightweight for a Corton and with a bit of spicy oak still evident. Presumably this will take on fat but for the moment seems a bit muted overall.
    Author: Jancis Robinson
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 94

    The 2014 Corton Charlemagne Grand Cru has a modest bouquet, bashful at first but finding its voice with aeration; it offers attractive scents of orange blossom and lime zest, almond paste and plenty of leesy notes. The palate is well balanced with a fine line of acidity. There is decent body and depth to this Corton-Charlemagne, perhaps a touch more |tropical| than others, but that is counterbalanced by the mineral seam that pokes through on the long finish. Excellent.
    Author: Neal Martin
  • No collector reviews available
  • Domaine Ponsot has been a top producer and catalyst for innovation in Burgundy since 1872. After the Franco-Prussian War, William Ponsot settled in Morey-Saint-Denis, bought a vineyard, which included the 1er Cru monopole Clos des Monts Luisants and a parcel of Clos de la Roche, and began producing wine. In the 1930s, Williams's nephew Hippolyte was among the first producers in Burgundy to practice estate bottling, and took part in founding the A.O.C. classification. In the 1960s, Hippolyte's son, Jean-Marie, was one of the pioneers of clonal selection of Pinot Noir. In fact, many of the most important Pinot Noir clones originate from mother vines in Ponsot's vineyards.

    Today, under the control of Laurent Ponsot, the domaine produces wine from tiny yields and using no new oak, a regime that has been referred to as "perennially inconsistent." To this critique, Laurent says, "We are lazy, we don't interfere with nature. My aim is to express the vintage and the terroir through my wines, not to express myself. Some people say we are inconsistent. To me this is the greatest possible compliment."

    Burgundy is home to some of the greatest and most expensive wines in the world. Stretching from Auxerre in the north to Lyon in the south, the region's most famous section is the limestone-rich Côte d'Or. Vineyards in Burgundy are classified according to their locations on the hillsides. Only 2% of total production is from grand cru sites, while premier cru and village-level wines are more common. It is rare for one domaine to own an entire vineyard; rather the land has been divided down to individual rows, in some cases as a result of inheritance laws. While other varieties can be found in Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay reign supreme. The best examples are capable of aging for 15 years or more, a rarity for these two varieties, making them highly valuable. 

    Chardonnay is a versatile variety that can grow in a wide range of climates, and its neutral flavor profile offers a blank canvas for winemakers to impart their style. In cool climates, Chardonnay displays flavors of green fruit and citrus. As the climate becomes more moderate, flavors of white peach and melon develop. In warm and hot climates, aromas of banana, pineapple, and other tropical fruit are common.

    The best Old-World Chardonnay comes from Burgundy, where it is uniquely reflective of terroir and can express many different flavor profiles even within this relatively small region. In Chablis, the northernmost part of Burgundy, wines are often unoaked and known for their minerality, high acidity, and aromas of green apple, citrus, wet stone, and slate. In the Côte de Beaune, further south, wines are typically aged in neutral French oak and have flavors of stone fruit, toast, almond, and cream. Burgundian producers pioneered the techniques that are now associated with high-quality Chardonnay around the world, including barrel fermentation, barrel ageing, malolactic fermentation, and maturation on lees. The best wines, from producers like Domaine Leflaive, Bouchard Père & Fils, and Domaine William Fèvre, can age in the bottle for a decade or more, developing complex aromas of nuts and mushroom.

    New-World Chardonnay tends to grow in warmer climates than in the Old World, producing wines that are full-bodied, high in alcohol, and low in acidity. Use of American oak imparts flavors of vanilla, clove, hazelnut, butter, and caramel on top of peach and banana fruit. Look to Californian producers in Napa and Sonoma, including Kistler, Peter Michael, and Aubert, for the highest-quality versions of this New-World style.

    Chardonnay’s versatility makes it a great option for pairing. High-acid wines from Chablis are the perfect accompaniment to oysters or clams, while oak-forward Napa wines are the best match for buttery lobster. Halibut, cod, and chicken breast are classic pairings with white Burgundy. 

    Collector Data For This Wine

    • 200 bottles owned
    • 18 collectors