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2012 Dujac - Charmes-Chambertin

FRANCE / BURGUNDY / GEVREY-CHAMBERTIN
abv 14.0%
  • 92 WA
  • 92 IWC
  • Variety
    Pinot Noir
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SKU: 46717-2012
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 93

    (two-thirds Charmes and one-third Mazoyeres): Good bright, dark red. Medicinal red cherry, gibier and sexy new oak on the distinctly wild nose. Sweet and penetrating on the palate, with good floral lift to the red berry flavors. The new-oaky quality carries through on the palate. In a rather robust style for Charmes-Chambertin but with no shortage of energy.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
    Issue: January/February 2014
  • Burghound | Rating: 94

    Reduction. This is much like the Combottes in that the mouth feel is exceptionally fine and sophisticated largely thanks to the fine grain of the supporting tannins as well as the abundance of palate coating dry extract. In this case though there is a bit more depth and length and even though the difference is slight it is nonetheless sufficient to push this to another level.
    Drink Dates: 2024+
    Author: Allen Meadows
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 93

    The 2012 Charmes-Chambertin Grand Cru comes from the Seysses family's 0.70-hectare holdings. It has a delightful bouquet that will surely be a joy once bottled: bright and vivacious red cherries and fresh strawberry fruit that contain so much energy. The palate is well balanced with supple tannins, the fruit profile here leaning slightly towards blacker side with a structured finish that is more 'seriousƒ?_ than the aromatics suggest. There are hints of black coffee appearing on the aftertaste. Perhaps this will have a longer evolutionary arc than other vintages? Intriguing!
    Author: Neal Martin
  • No collector reviews available
  • Jacques Seysses began his career as a winemaker in 1965 as an intern of Gerard Potel at Pousse d'Or. The experience paid off as he gleaned valuable information from the great Burgundian winemakers of the time. In 1967, he struck out on his own with the purchase of Domaine Graillet in Morey St Denis, which he renamed Domaine Dujac. The first vintage, in 1968, proved a complete disaster, but Jacques rebounded quickly, producing one of Burgundy's best wines in 1969. As the domaine gained recognition, the estate and its production grew. Today Dujac stretches over 12 hectares of prime Burgundy real estate in eleven appellations, including eight Grand Cru holdings, and turns out just under 5,000 cases a year.

    The winemaking philosophy at Dujac is open-minded, experimental, and successful. A true family affair, winemaking is directed by Jacques and son Jeremy, and Jeremy's wife Diana, an oenologist trained at UC Davis, manages the cellar and laboratory. Since 1986, the domaine has been in "lutte intege," a regime combining organic, biodynamic, and integrated pest management strategies to produce the highest quality fruit. Pinots and Chardonnays from Dujac reflect this approach, garnering high scores and praise from critics year in and year out.

    In 2004, the Seysses family began acting as negociants, partnering with local winegrowers in the Cote d'Or to produce wines bearing the Dujac Fils & Pere designation.

    See other similar producers:Domaine des Lambrays,Domaine Michel Magnien,Domaine Denis Mortet

    Burgundy is home to some of the greatest and most expensive wines in the world. Stretching from Auxerre in the north to Lyon in the south, the region's most famous section is the limestone-rich Côte d'Or. Vineyards in Burgundy are classified according to their locations on the hillsides. Only 2% of total production is from grand cru sites, while premier cru and village-level wines are more common. It is rare for one domaine to own an entire vineyard; rather the land has been divided down to individual rows, in some cases as a result of inheritance laws. While other varieties can be found in Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay reign supreme. The best examples are capable of aging for 15 years or more, a rarity for these two varieties, making them highly valuable. 

    Pinot Noir is a delicate, thin-skinned grape that is notoriously difficult to grow but unmatched in its ability to reflect its terroir. It is early-budding and early-ripening, and thus requires a cool climate. To achieve its best expression and maintain its delicate flavor profile, Pinot Noir demands great care in the vineyard, particular attention to yield management, and careful handling in the winery. Growers blessed with the patience, skill, and terroir to produce world-class Pinot Noir are greatly rewarded. Not only are these wines complex, age-worthy, and delicious, they also command some of the world’s highest prices.

    Old-World Pinot Noir most famously hails from Burgundy, where it is the only red variety permitted in the region. Techniques such as whole-bunch fermentation and barrel ageing, now common amongst high-quality Pinot Noir producers around the world, were pioneered by Burgundian winemakers. Age-worthy Pinot Noir from Burgundy tends to be high in acid, display low to medium tannins, and have red fruit flavors in youth that evolve into complex flavors of earth, game, cola, and truffle with age. Some of the most famous producers include Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Domaine Comte de Vogüé, Domaine Leroy, and Domaine Armand Rousseau.

    New-World Pinot Noir tends to grow in warmer climates and on newer vines than in the Old Word, producing wine that is more fruit-forward with flavors of red cherry, cranberry, and raspberry. The highest-quality wines come from moderate regions in California, particularly Sonoma and Carneros, and top producers include Marcassin, Kistler, and Kosta Browne.

    High acidity, low tannin, and low alcohol make Pinot Noir a versatile wine to pair. Spiced duck, fatty fish, grilled chicken, spicy foods, and anything with mushroom are just a few classic examples.

    Collector Data For This Wine

    • 77 bottles owned
    • 14 collectors