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2010 Roberto Voerzio - Barolo Rocche dell'Annunziata (Riserva)

ITALY / PIEDMONT /
abv 14.5%
  • 96 WA
  • 97 IWC
  • 17 JR
  • 95 JS
  • Variety
    Nebbiolo
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SKU: 255248-2010-750-3A
  • JamesSuckling.com | Rating: 95

    Another top Barolo for 2010 with pure aromas of sliced plum and rose petal with hints of Spanish cedar. Full body, with ultra fine tannins and a juicy and fruity finish. Better in 2017.
    Author: James Suckling
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 17

    La Morra. Just mid ruby with bricky tinges. Savoury, minerally notes with a hint of walnut skin and dried fruit. Quite understated on the palate after the power of Brunate. Fully integrated acidity, just striking a balance. (WS)
    Drink Dates: 2016-2030
    Author: Walter Speller
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 96

    The 2010 Barolo Torriglione (tasted in a magnum) represents a new wine for Roberto Voerzio. He actually tells me that he prefers the wines as two separate expressions rather than one blended wine. This was a result he did not expect since he was used to tasting them together. The Torriglione does stand out with its own character thanks to the extra firmness it shows in the mouth. This wine has great potential for long aging. Drink: 2017-2035.
    Drink Dates: 2017-2035
    Author: Monica Larner
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 97

    Voerzio's 2010 Barolo Rocche dell'Annunziata is strikingly beautiful. This is the first vintage in which there is no Torgglione, and it shows in the wine's remarkable finesse, nuance and detail. The 2010 boasts striking aromatics and a weightless, utterly captivating personality supported by the finest, most silky Nebbiolo tannins imaginable. This is the Musigny of Barolo and a wine of total pleasure. - Antonio Galloni
    Drink Dates: 2020-2035
  • No collector reviews available
  • For years considered an oddity in Piedmont, Roberto Voerzio has proven to the naysayers and detractors that his techniques, a consummate melding of old and new elevage methods, do work and produce wines of unquestionable concentration and harmonious balance. He is almost fanatical in his insistence upon extraordinarily low yields; high density plantings and 2-4 clusters of grapes per vine are the norm. The cellar regimen is tailored to each vineyard's production, not over-regulating fermentations and employing a precise melange of new and used oak to achieve the overall "perfect" package. The wines are deceptive in that they are luscious and approachable, replete with ripe fruit and floral notes, but a hidden spine of structure and massive underlying tannins create an absolutely stunning Nebbiolo experience. These are rare wines that consistently rank among the best the Piedmont offers, and Voerzio is a true Nebbiolo legend.

    See other similar producers:La Spinetta,Azienda Agricola Pelissero
    Piedmont, which literally means “foot of the mountain,” produces some of Italy's finest red wines. Its clay, limestone, and sand soils are home to the legendary Barolo and Barbaresco wines, made from the extremely age-worthy Nebbiolo variety. Dolcetto and Barbera are considered to be more “workhorse” varieties, and produce the largest quantity of wine. The region is tucked in the cool northwest corner of the country, surrounded on three sides by the Alps. Fog often blankets the region, ensuring long, cool growing seasons. 

    Nebbiolo is the king of Piedmont, and usually the only grape in the Barolo and Barbaresco wines of this Italian region. A continental climate brings long summers and a substantial amount of rainfall, allowing for extended time on the vine and optimal ripeness. As a result, Nebbiolo is high in both acid and tannin, bringing a beautiful balance to these wines and making them suitable for long-term ageing. The typical flavors of Nebbiolo include red currant, strawberry, roses, leather, and anise.

    In Barolo, with its high altitude, Nebbiolo develops perfumed aromas of sour cherries, herbs, and dried flowers. Barolo DOCG wines must be aged for a minimum of three years with at least 18 months in oak before release. Further ageing in bottle adds complex aromas of truffle, tar, and leather. Nebbiolo from Barbaresco is less perfumed and must be aged for a minimum of two years with at least nine months in oak before release.  Some of the best examples of this variety come from Bruno Giacosa, Gaja, Giacomo Conterno, and Roberto Voerzio.

    The delicate aromas, bold tannin, and high acid of Nebbiolo pair best with foods high in butter, fat and olive oil. Classic examples include truffles, prosciutto, boar ragu, pork loin, and a range of cheeses, but it is also a great match for Asian cuisine.

    Collector Data For This Wine

    • 140 bottles owned
    • 22 collectors