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  • 2010 Jacques-Frederic Mugnier - Musigny

2010 Jacques-Frederic Mugnier - Musigny

FRANCE / BURGUNDY / CHAMBOLLE-MUSIGNY
  • 98 WA
  • 98 IWC
  • Variety
    Pinot Noir
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SKU: 55180-2010-750-2B
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 98

    Deep, dark, saturated red. Knockout nose combines black cherry, black raspberry, minerals, graphite and licorice. Like liquid silk in the mouth, conveying great thickness of texture without any weight. Noble, utterly vibrant wine with near-perfect balance and a finish that mounts for two minutes or more. A sappy essence of Burgundy. Mugnier calls 2010 |Burgundy at its best,| and this wine makes his case.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
  • Burghound | Rating: 97

    Here the broad ranging nose is actually similar to that of the Amoureuses but it's both cooler and even more restrained. The penetratingly mineral-driven large-scaled flavors are an exercise in refinement with tremendous depth of material that pushes the very firm tannic spine to the background on the palate staining, linear and stunning intense finish. This magnificent effort is regal and aloof at this point and is conceding little in terms of accessibility yet it's irreproachably well-balanced which should permit this magnificent effort to develop slowly but surely over the next 15 plus years. The 2010 Musigny is yet another in a long line of great vintages of this wine from Mugnier.
    Author: Allen Meadows
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 98

    The 2010 Musigny is breathtaking. It is at once weightless yet full of flavor and dynamism. There is marvelous tension and sheer energy in the fruit, while certain elements of virility- especially in the tannin- seem to develop as the wine sits in the glass. Like all of the Mugnier wines, the Musigny is really a wine built on textural finesse and a certain elusiveness that asks more of the taster than it offers. It represents the height of sensuality and unknowable beauty in Burgundy. In many ways Mugnier's Musigny resembles Domaine de la Romanee-Conti's Romanee-Conti. No matter how much time I spend with the wine there is always more to discover
    Author: Antonio Galloni
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  • This estate began in the 1880s as one of many estates owned by Francois Mugnier, a Dijon businessman who decided to put his focus into wine when he turned 30. Chambolle had experienced a massive phylloxera outbreak earlier that year, and Mugnier wanted to bring the land back from devastation. He succeeded in revitalizing the vineyard, and produced quality Pinot Noir for the next 20 years. After his death in the early 1900s, his seven children took over the estate and began exporting premium wines to Paris and the United States. Today, they focus on lutte raisonée—a style of viticulture that avoids an over-dependence on chemicals.

    Their approach to both viticulture and winemaking is aimed at preserving in the wines the purest expression of nature with minimal interference from technological practices. The vines are managed almost organically—no herbicides since 1991, no pesticides since 1997 and now only two treatments a year (against mildew) which are not organic.

    The grapes are sorted diligently by the pickers before coming to the cellar in small cases. All stalks are removed and the whole berries are then transferred into vats. The wines are bottled after a second winter in wood without fining or filtration. The wines are known for being light in color, but brilliantly fragrant and notably persistent on the finish.

    Burgundy is home to some of the greatest and most expensive wines in the world. Stretching from Auxerre in the north to Lyon in the south, the region's most famous section is the limestone-rich Côte d'Or. Vineyards in Burgundy are classified according to their locations on the hillsides. Only 2% of total production is from grand cru sites, while premier cru and village-level wines are more common. It is rare for one domaine to own an entire vineyard; rather the land has been divided down to individual rows, in some cases as a result of inheritance laws. While other varieties can be found in Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay reign supreme. The best examples are capable of aging for 15 years or more, a rarity for these two varieties, making them highly valuable. 

    Pinot Noir is a delicate, thin-skinned grape that is notoriously difficult to grow but unmatched in its ability to reflect its terroir. It is early-budding and early-ripening, and thus requires a cool climate. To achieve its best expression and maintain its delicate flavor profile, Pinot Noir demands great care in the vineyard, particular attention to yield management, and careful handling in the winery. Growers blessed with the patience, skill, and terroir to produce world-class Pinot Noir are greatly rewarded. Not only are these wines complex, age-worthy, and delicious, they also command some of the world’s highest prices.

    Old-World Pinot Noir most famously hails from Burgundy, where it is the only red variety permitted in the region. Techniques such as whole-bunch fermentation and barrel ageing, now common amongst high-quality Pinot Noir producers around the world, were pioneered by Burgundian winemakers. Age-worthy Pinot Noir from Burgundy tends to be high in acid, display low to medium tannins, and have red fruit flavors in youth that evolve into complex flavors of earth, game, cola, and truffle with age. Some of the most famous producers include Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Domaine Comte de Vogüé, Domaine Leroy, and Domaine Armand Rousseau.

    New-World Pinot Noir tends to grow in warmer climates and on newer vines than in the Old Word, producing wine that is more fruit-forward with flavors of red cherry, cranberry, and raspberry. The highest-quality wines come from moderate regions in California, particularly Sonoma and Carneros, and top producers include Marcassin, Kistler, and Kosta Browne.

    High acidity, low tannin, and low alcohol make Pinot Noir a versatile wine to pair. Spiced duck, fatty fish, grilled chicken, spicy foods, and anything with mushroom are just a few classic examples.

    Collector Data For This Wine

    • 128 bottles owned
    • 25 collectors