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2007 Domaine du Clos de Tart - Clos de Tart

FRANCE / BURGUNDY / MOREY-SAINT-DENIS
  • 93 WA
  • 94 WS
  • 92 IWC
  • 90 JR
  • Variety
    Pinot Noir
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SKU: 47834-2007-750-1A
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 92

    ($540; bottled in April of 2009) Bright red-ruby. Liqueur-like black raspberry, mocha and spices on the nose, with a hint of dried fruits. Then opulent, sweet and highly concentrated on the palate, with cherry, mineral and licorice flavors sexed up by a note of molten chocolate. This lacks the peppery high notes of the young 2008 but the texture is more plush today. Finishes with very fine-grained tannins and enough energy to ensure an extended evolution in bottle.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
    Issue: March/April 2010
  • Burghound | Rating: 92

    An expressive and quite cool nose blends floral notes, discreet wood, spice hints and ripe black pinot and plum that seamlessly intermingle with rich, delicious and impressively concentrated big-bodied flavors that possess really lovely acid/fruit/tannin balance, all wrapped in a complex, serious and palate staining finish. The subtle influence of the stem tannins gives the very rich, indeed almost lush finish an appealing sense of lift. This displays excellent potential to develop over the next 10 to 15 years and it should last 30.
    Author: Allen Meadows
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 18

    Cask sample but soon to be bottled.Deep bright garnet. Slightly darker fruit character than some recent vintages. Firm and dark, rich and powerful. Peppery. Really long. Tight, determined and focused. (JH)
    Author: Julia Harding MW
    Issue: 06-11-2009
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 94

    Intense aromas of graphite and mineral make an immediate impact, with black cherry, black currant and spice flavors adding depth and dimension. This has concentration and a juicy texture, pushing the long, peppery aftertaste. Shows fine harmony and expression overall.
    Author: Bruce Sanderson
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 93

    Sweetly perfumed with flowers and with black fruit candies that render a confectionary impression on the palate (and Sylvain Pitiot did not demur from my description: 'bonbon-likeƒ?_), the 2007 Clos de Tart manages to harmoniously integrate vanilla, caramel, and resin from new wood. Even more than in the corresponding 2008, fresh juiciness of cassis and black raspberry and a saliva-stimulating salinity lend this lift and enticement so that it doesn't become another too-familiar modern-day exercise in mere dark berry jam on a new oaken shingle. Sandalwood and black tea contribute further interest. Judgments will differ depending on the degree to which one is attracted by the style of this polished and persistent confection of Pinot Noir, but it certainly reflects what Pitiot describes as 'my intention ' and my taste ' (namely) always to harvest just before the limiting point of over-ripeness and excess is reached.ƒ?_ I would anticipate this showcasing its virtues and Pitiot's ideal over the next 7-10 years, and doubt that the 2008 will ever be able to compensate for its relatively less charm, seductiveness, or seamlessness.
    Author: David Schildknecht
  • No collector reviews available
  • Mommessin began in southern Burgundy as an inheritance from the Cluny monks. Founder Jean-Marie Mommessin built his wine business on the Grange Saint-Pierre estate in 1865, and soon claimed multiple vineyards under the Mommessin name. By far the most fruitful of these purchases was the renowned Clos de Tart, which Mommessin acquired from the Marey-Monge family in 1932. As the decades passed, the estate moved its head offices to the heart of Burgundy, focusing most strongly on its Clos de Tart label. By 1996, the vineyard was well-established as a quality Burgundy producer, but it gained an exemplary status under the new winemaker Sylvain Pitiot. When he took over the estate's daily operations, Pitiot's meticulous methods and attention to detail resulted in wines that received the highest ratings of any previous vintages produced on the estate. Today, Clos de Tart has defended its title as one of the best wine labels in the center of Burgundy.

    The House Mommessin motto states that "Humans are in the service of the grapes." Pitiot takes this idea seriously, using biodynamic techniques to make his wines. The bottles are always unfiltered after being matured in 100 percent new oak, which Pitiot has said results in more terroir-specific wines. The Clos de Tart label is made using a blend of the best plots and oldest vines in the vineyard. Each plot is vinified separately before being blended together just before bottling, based on the type of soil in which they grew. Although the AOC allows for higher yields in the region, Mommessin keeps its grapevines severely pruned back, resulting in significantly lower yields than average. This, coupled with the age of the vines, produces grapes that are more concentrated in flavor and that ripen more easily. To further take advantage of these qualities, Mommessin has the latest harvests of nearly any Burgundy producer, and pre-macerates the grapes before barreling.

    Burgundy is home to some of the greatest and most expensive wines in the world. Stretching from Auxerre in the north to Lyon in the south, the region's most famous section is the limestone-rich Côte d'Or. Vineyards in Burgundy are classified according to their locations on the hillsides. Only 2% of total production is from grand cru sites, while premier cru and village-level wines are more common. It is rare for one domaine to own an entire vineyard; rather the land has been divided down to individual rows, in some cases as a result of inheritance laws. While other varieties can be found in Burgundy, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay reign supreme. The best examples are capable of aging for 15 years or more, a rarity for these two varieties, making them highly valuable. 

    Pinot Noir is a delicate, thin-skinned grape that is notoriously difficult to grow but unmatched in its ability to reflect its terroir. It is early-budding and early-ripening, and thus requires a cool climate. To achieve its best expression and maintain its delicate flavor profile, Pinot Noir demands great care in the vineyard, particular attention to yield management, and careful handling in the winery. Growers blessed with the patience, skill, and terroir to produce world-class Pinot Noir are greatly rewarded. Not only are these wines complex, age-worthy, and delicious, they also command some of the world’s highest prices.

    Old-World Pinot Noir most famously hails from Burgundy, where it is the only red variety permitted in the region. Techniques such as whole-bunch fermentation and barrel ageing, now common amongst high-quality Pinot Noir producers around the world, were pioneered by Burgundian winemakers. Age-worthy Pinot Noir from Burgundy tends to be high in acid, display low to medium tannins, and have red fruit flavors in youth that evolve into complex flavors of earth, game, cola, and truffle with age. Some of the most famous producers include Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, Domaine Comte de Vogüé, Domaine Leroy, and Domaine Armand Rousseau.

    New-World Pinot Noir tends to grow in warmer climates and on newer vines than in the Old Word, producing wine that is more fruit-forward with flavors of red cherry, cranberry, and raspberry. The highest-quality wines come from moderate regions in California, particularly Sonoma and Carneros, and top producers include Marcassin, Kistler, and Kosta Browne.

    High acidity, low tannin, and low alcohol make Pinot Noir a versatile wine to pair. Spiced duck, fatty fish, grilled chicken, spicy foods, and anything with mushroom are just a few classic examples.

    Collector Data For This Wine

    • 560 bottles owned
    • 71 collectors