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2006 Leoville Las Cases

FRANCE / BORDEAUX / SAINT-JULIEN
abv 13.0%
  • 96 WA
  • 95 WS
  • 94 IWC
  • 16 JR
  • Variety
    Red Bordeaux Blend
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SKU: 52977-2006-750-1A
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 94

    ($150-$250) Bright, full ruby. Brooding aromas of cassis, black cherry, minerals, bitter chocolate, shoe polish and violet; more Pauillac than Saint-Julien on the nose. Then rich, lush and powerful, with impressive fullness and volume. As full and sweet as this is, there's no impression of excess weight and the back end shows a distinctly austere quality, even if the serious tannins are nicely buffered by the wine's rich middle. Really stains the palate with flavor on the aftertaste. Wonderfully ripe cabernet sauvignon here; in fact, most of the cab franc in 2006 was declassified into the Clos du Marquis.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
    Issue: May/June 2009
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 95

    Offers a pure nose of crushed raspberry and violet, with aniseed. Full-bodied, with beautiful, well-integrated tannins and a long, polished texture to the finish. Very beautiful. Harmonious and structured.
    Author: James Suckling
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 96

    Tasted at Bordeaux Index's annual 10-Year On tasting in London and then blind at Farr Vintners horizontal, the 2006 Chateau Leoville Las-Cases has a very complex bouquet with heady scents of blackcurrant, kirsch, crushed violets, rock salt and just a hint of cassis. It is backward and can barely contain its energy. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, very symmetrical and poised, a fine line of acidity interwoven through the black fruit, touches of citrus fruit developing towards the poised and tensile finish. This is a beautiful wine from Jean-Hubert Delon, but it needs several years in bottle. Tasted April 2016.
    Author: Neal Martin
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 15

    Tasted blind. Still pretty blue! Some sweet slight oakiness on the nose. A bit specious? Thick chewy tannins on the end. Hard work!
    Author: Jancis Robinson
  • Self | Rating:

    Drink Dates: 2019-2035
    Author: ciaoa2t
The Second Growth classified estate of Leoville Las Cases continues to produce wines of exceptional quality, rivaling those of the First Growth producers. The wines are full-bodied, concentrated and complex, and have tremendous aging potential. Typical blends consist of over 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, with lesser amounts of Merlot and Cabernet Franc, and a small amount of Petit Verdot. Bargain hunters should also keep an eye out for the estate's second label, Clos du Marquis.

See other similar producers:Chateau Leoville Barton,Clos Louie,Chateau Cantemerle
Located in the southwest of France, Bordeaux is the single largest fine-wine-producing region in the world, with more than 15,000 growers spread over 57 appellations and more than 700 million bottles produced annually. The region boasts a two-thousand-year winemaking history and some of the wine world's most recognized and highly sought-after names. Red Bordeaux blends comprise eighty percent of production, but dry and sweet whites are also well-known. The region is divided into the Left and Right Banks (of the Dordogne River); Cabernet Sauvignon prevails in the former and Merlot in the latter.

White Bordeaux blends are most commonly composed of Sémillon and Sauvignon Blanc, and come in a range of dry and sweet styles. Sémillon contributes body while Sauvignon Blanc adds high acidity, a characteristic that is particularly important in the sweet wines of Bordeaux.

Sauternes is one of the world’s most prestigious regions for sweet wine production, made possible by Sémillon’s affinity for noble rot. Wines from world-renowned Château d’Yquem are fermented and matured in new oak for up to three years and can age for decades in bottle. These wines display complex aromas of melon, honey, apricot, citrus peel, mango, and butterscotch and develop added complexity and aromas with age.

The best dry wines from this blend come from producers such as Château Haut-Brion, Château Pape Clément, and Domaine de Chevalier in Pessac-Léognan and Graves. These wines are typically fermented and matured in new oak and display a full-bodied richness with concentrated nutty flavors overlaying the fruit.

Due to its freshness and flavor profile, dry white Bordeaux blends pair well with almost any white food, including all types of fish, poultry, veal, and pork. The sweet wines of Bordeaux pair well with foie gras, oysters, blue cheese, spicy food (particularly Asian cuisines), any dish with sweet notes, and of course, dessert.

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 1408 bottles owned
  • 114 collectors