2003 Troplong-Mondot

FRANCE / BORDEAUX / SAINT-ÉMILION
  • 94 WA
  • 91 WS
  • 92 IWC
  • 78 JR
  • Variety
    Red Bordeaux Blend
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SKU: 54536-2003-750-2B
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 92

    ($60) Red-ruby. Sappy aromas of very ripe redcurrant, tobacco and minerals. Fat, sexy and deep, with flavors of redcurrant, plum, tobacco and spice lifted by the wine's mineral component. Wonderfully rich, full-blown wine, finishing with serious toothcoating tannins that call for at least four or five years of patience. This is close to 14% alcohol, but even this vintage of Troplong-Mondot has more acidity than the 1990.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
    Issue: May/June 2006
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 91

    Beautiful plum, berry and raspberry aromas follow through to a full-bodied palate, with refined tannins and a long, caressing finish. Very nicely done. 3,915 cases made.
    Author: James Suckling
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 15

    Healthy crimson. Sweet and relatively simple. Chewy, fine tannins, but without quite enough fruit concentration first. Serviceable, but I can't imagine this will make old bones.
    Author: Jancis Robinson
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 94

    Troplong Mondot's 2003 is a brilliant success in this vintage, largely because of the limestone soils and incredibly low yields. There are nearly 70 acres of vines in production, yields were tiny, and the harvest was early. Nevertheless, there is an opulence and youthfulness in this wine that suggest it has at least a decade of life left. A luxurious effort with high glycerin, loads of blueberry, mulberry, black currant, licorice and charcoal ember-like notes, full body, low acidity and sweet tannin, this beauty is close to full maturity and can be drunk now as well as over the next decade.
    Author: Robert Parker
  • Self | Rating: 92

    Drink Dates: 2012-2025
    Author: MikeB
  • Self | Rating: 96

    Author: Walter Z
This St. Emilion estate, which dates back to 1745, was once part of the larger domaine that included Chateau Pavie. A century later it was bought by Raymond Troplong, whose name was added to the label. Later, Alexandre Valette, a Parisian vintner, bought the estate in 1980, his great-granddaughter Christine took over the estate. In 2006 the vineyard was selected to Premier Grand Cru Classe status. Thick limestone and dense clay make this vineyard perfect for growing Merlot (which comprises 90% of the vineyards). Wines produced from this estate are powerful and contain complex tannins. The remaining plantings are divided equally between Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. In 1985 the chateau introduced the second label Mondot, which has gained clout as a grand cru in its own right. More recently Christine Valette has produced a rose called Le Clairet de Mondot.
Located in the southwest of France, Bordeaux is the single largest fine-wine-producing region in the world, with more than 15,000 growers spread over 57 appellations and more than 700 million bottles produced annually. The region boasts a two-thousand-year winemaking history and some of the wine world's most recognized and highly sought-after names. Red Bordeaux blends comprise eighty percent of production, but dry and sweet whites are also well-known. The region is divided into the Left and Right Banks (of the Dordogne River); Cabernet Sauvignon prevails in the former and Merlot in the latter.

White Bordeaux blends are most commonly composed of Sémillon and Sauvignon Blanc, and come in a range of dry and sweet styles. Sémillon contributes body while Sauvignon Blanc adds high acidity, a characteristic that is particularly important in the sweet wines of Bordeaux.

Sauternes is one of the world’s most prestigious regions for sweet wine production, made possible by Sémillon’s affinity for noble rot. Wines from world-renowned Château d’Yquem are fermented and matured in new oak for up to three years and can age for decades in bottle. These wines display complex aromas of melon, honey, apricot, citrus peel, mango, and butterscotch and develop added complexity and aromas with age.

The best dry wines from this blend come from producers such as Château Haut-Brion, Château Pape Clément, and Domaine de Chevalier in Pessac-Léognan and Graves. These wines are typically fermented and matured in new oak and display a full-bodied richness with concentrated nutty flavors overlaying the fruit.

Due to its freshness and flavor profile, dry white Bordeaux blends pair well with almost any white food, including all types of fish, poultry, veal, and pork. The sweet wines of Bordeaux pair well with foie gras, oysters, blue cheese, spicy food (particularly Asian cuisines), any dish with sweet notes, and of course, dessert.

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 682 bottles owned
  • 118 collectors
  • Average collector rating: 94
    (Out of 118 collectors)