• Home
  • 1999 Moet & Chandon - Dom Perignon

1999 Moet & Chandon - Dom Perignon

FRANCE / CHAMPAGNE /
abv 12.5%
  • 93 WA
  • 90 WS
  • 93 IWC
  • 18 JR
  • Variety
    Champagne Blend
See all wines from Moët & Chandon
See other vintages 1983 | 1990 | 1993 | 1995 | 1998 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2008 | 2009 |
In stock|Sold out

learn more about producers & collectors

SKU: 49438-1999
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 18

    Served not blind immediately after 2002 through to 2006 (which were all served blind), so of course it seemed particularly beautiful. Pale creamy minerally savoury nose. Really lively and punchy. Some smokiness. A hint of honey. Very good bottle.
    Author: Jancis Robinson
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 93

    The 1999 Dom Perignon is a little flabbier than the 2000. Smoke, toastiness, tar and ripe fruit emerge from the glass in a generous, expansive style. The 1999 offers more body than the 2000 but the aromas and flavors are less well-articulated. This is a relatively simple Dom Perignon, yet the wine possesses outstanding balance and plenty of harmony. According to Chef de Caves Richard Geoffroy the warm vintage also resulted in relatively high yields, and the low-acid style is most reminiscent of the 1976.
    Author: Antonio Galloni
    Issue: 03-01-2009
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 90

    There's a high-toned minty graphite accent to the aroma, with a citric edge on the palate. The structure is overlaid with lemon and bread dough notes. This is tight and crisp on the finish, so break out the sole or shellfish, or wait a few years.
    Author: Bruce Sanderson
  • Rating: 93

    These four vintages of Dom Perignon provide a fascinating snapshot of how the house has performed in recent years. The 1999 Dom Perignon is a little flabbier than the 2000. Smoke, toastiness, tar and ripe fruit emerge from the glass in a generous, expansive style. The 1999 offers more body than the 2000 but the aromas and flavors are less well-articulated. This is a relatively simple Dom Perignon, yet the wine possesses outstanding balance and plenty of harmony. According to Chef de Caves Richard Geoffroy the warm vintage also resulted in relatively high yields, and the low-acid style is most reminiscent of the 1976. - Antonio Galloni
  • Self | Rating: 98

    Author: David W294
  • Self | Rating: 65

    Author: Sechang P
  • Self | Rating: 90

    Author: Ronn L
  • Self | Rating: 91

    Enjoyed this champagne on my wife's birthday. Everyone liked the wine. The bubbles so sooo small, incredible!! Taste of fine champagne, indeed.
    Drink Dates: 2009-2012
    Author: kukie
  • Self | Rating: 92

    Somewhere between an everday champagne and the Grand Dame, this has tastes of cirus rinds integrated into the taste. Very enjoyable, but not prehaps as blow-away the name that preceeds it.
    Author: Andrew S651
  • Self | Rating: 93

    TBC
    Author: Horms
  • Self | Rating: 88

    Very good champagne, not as good as other champagnes in the same price range.
    Author: serge
Dating back to 1743, Moet & Chandon is the largest and most recognized champagne brand and producer in the world. Dom Perignon, its most famous label, took its name from the Benedictine monk whom legend claims was the first to produce the sparkling beverage we know as champagne. The company was founded by Dutchman Claude Moet, who originally shipped wine to Paris to supply the royal court's growing desire for sparkling wine. The company introduced the concept of vintage champagne in the 1840s and began their popular brand "Brut Imperial" in the 1860s. Today Moet & Chandon is a segment of the international luxury goods brand "LVMH," after merging with Hennessy Cognac in 1971 and Louis Vuitton in 1987. Moet & Chandon also fathered the sparkling wine venture Domaine Chandon in the Napa Valley.

Click here to listen to GrapeRadio's podcast about Dom Perignon (Show #170, 1:11:15 min 50 MB)

See other similar producers:Domaine Egly Ouriet,Jean Vesselle

Champagne is the northernmost wine region of France, located 90 miles outside of Paris. Its storied wine reputation dates back to the Middle Ages; a few of the top houses, to which so much of the region's fame is owed, have been producing since the early 1700s. As one of the coolest wine producing regions in the world, Champagne is perfectly suited to growing Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier at the low sugar/high acid levels necessary for sparkling wines. The region's famous chalk soils not only reflect sunlight back to the vines, helping them to ripen, but also impart minerality to the fruit, giving Champagne its characteristic flavor profile. 

Champagne is a challenging place to grow grapes. Winter freeze, spring frost, heavy rains, and cloudy skies in this cool, continental climate are the norm. Growers must manage a high degree of annual volatility in weather and blending across varieties and vintages is required to create consistency in the wines. Despite the challenges, Champagne has an ideal climate and terroir for sparkling wine production. Chalk-dominated soils provide drainage after rainstorms but retain sufficient water during dry periods, and cool weather produces grapes with high acid and low sugar levels, even in the warmest years. In the rare seasons when weather conditions are at their best, wine aficionados across the globe are blessed with vintage Champagne, one of the most age-worthy and delicious wines in the world.

Champagne blends are composed of the region’s three main varieties: Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Meunier. Chardonnay contributes a light body, high acidity, and floral and citrus fruit character to the wine. Pinot Noir adds body and structure along with aromas of red fruit, while Pinot Meunier contributes fresh fruit. Blanc de Blancs Champagnes are made from white grapes only, while Blanc de Noirs Champagnes are made with black grapes only.

Young champagne typically displays aromas of pear, apple, lemon, popcorn, vanilla, almonds, and cream. With age, Champagne can impart very complex mineral- and earth-driven aromas. For some of the finest examples, look to the houses of Moët & Chandon (Dom Pérignon), Krug, Louis Roederer, and Bollinger.

Champagne’s high acidity and festive bubbles make it one of our favorite pairings, and match it well with buttery, fatty, and salty foods. Classics include caviar, oysters, clams, creamy cheeses, charcuterie, foie gras, and popcorn.

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 2310 bottles owned
  • 488 collectors
  • Average collector rating: 88
    (Out of 488 collectors)