• Home
  • 1999 Giacomo Conterno Barolo Cascina Francia

1999 Giacomo Conterno Barolo Cascina Francia

ITALY / PIEDMONT / SERRALUNGA
  • 92 WA
  • 92 IWC
  • Variety
    Nebbiolo

Out of stock

learn more about producers & collectors

SKU: 43702-1999-750

This item is available by the case only

Total:
$285.00

This is a final sale item

Not eligible for cancellations or refunds

  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 92

    ($100) Good full red. Sappy, floral aromas of rose petal and underbrush. Juicy, bright and pure, with outstanding precision of flavor and floral lift. Dense, powerful and penetrating-and more vibrant than the 2000. Finishes with very suave, broad tannins.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
    Issue: November/December 2004
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 92

    Consumers in search of the epitome of classic Barolo will be well rewarded in the 1999 Barolo Cascina Francia, a vintage which the family is very happy with. Medium garnet (color is never particularly deep here), its spicy-resinous nose, warm, penetrating, and alcoholic, promises much pleasure, a commitment which the palate respects in its ample texture, superior continuity and drive, lovely kirsch and licorice flavors, and unusually supple tannins. Substantial and enveloping, it will easily evolve well for twenty years.
    Author: Daniel Thomases
  • Self | Rating: 93

    Author: birkintree
Cantine Giacomo Conterno wines are among some of the finest Barolo produced in all of Piedmont. Made by tradionalist methods, his winemaking began sometime around 1908 - with family viticulture roots dating back to the 18th century.

Giacomo Conterno's two sons, Giovanni and Aldo Conterno, formally took over the estate in 1961. With the older Giovanni Conterno already responsible for winemaking since the 1959 vintage, Aldo Conterno eventually parted ways over conflicting winemaking philosophies with his brother, and he then founded his own estate: Poderi Aldo Conterno in 1969. Both wineries share the view that the "modernist" approach (using small oak barrels and shorter maceration times) undermines the inherent fruit of the Nebbiolo by adding too much vanilla flavor to the wine. Roberto Conterno, became the 4th generation to man the helm in 2003, and has continued the traditions, while expanding the estate's holdings to include 3 hectares of Ceretta vines.

Today, Conterno's Monfortino Riserva (their Grand Cru) is only produced in exceptional years - at times when the full expression of the Nebbiolo grape can be seen in the wines. A lot like the wines of Giacosa and Gaja, Conterno wines are deserving of a place in any cellar for their age-ability both as an investment or eventual drinking pleasure.

*Pictured (left) - 'The Arione Single Vineyard purchased by Cantina Giacomo Conterno'
Piedmont, which literally means “foot of the mountain,” produces some of Italy's finest red wines. Its clay, limestone, and sand soils are home to the legendary Barolo and Barbaresco wines, made from the extremely age-worthy Nebbiolo variety. Dolcetto and Barbera are considered to be more “workhorse” varieties, and produce the largest quantity of wine. The region is tucked in the cool northwest corner of the country, surrounded on three sides by the Alps. Fog often blankets the region, ensuring long, cool growing seasons. 

Nebbiolo is the king of Piedmont, and usually the only grape in the Barolo and Barbaresco wines of this Italian region. A continental climate brings long summers and a substantial amount of rainfall, allowing for extended time on the vine and optimal ripeness. As a result, Nebbiolo is high in both acid and tannin, bringing a beautiful balance to these wines and making them suitable for long-term ageing. The typical flavors of Nebbiolo include red currant, strawberry, roses, leather, and anise.

In Barolo, with its high altitude, Nebbiolo develops perfumed aromas of sour cherries, herbs, and dried flowers. Barolo DOCG wines must be aged for a minimum of three years with at least 18 months in oak before release. Further ageing in bottle adds complex aromas of truffle, tar, and leather. Nebbiolo from Barbaresco is less perfumed and must be aged for a minimum of two years with at least nine months in oak before release.  Some of the best examples of this variety come from Bruno Giacosa, Gaja, Giacomo Conterno, and Roberto Voerzio.

The delicate aromas, bold tannin, and high acid of Nebbiolo pair best with foods high in butter, fat and olive oil. Classic examples include truffles, prosciutto, boar ragu, pork loin, and a range of cheeses, but it is also a great match for Asian cuisine.

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 452 bottles owned
  • 79 collectors