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1996 Lagrange (St Julien)

FRANCE / BORDEAUX / SAINT-JULIEN
  • 90 WA
  • 90 WS
  • 93 IWC
  • 80 JR
  • Variety
    Red Bordeaux Blend
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SKU: 52688-1996-750-0
  • International Wine Cellar | Rating: 93

    (very much a cabernet-dominated vintage, with 57% cabernet sauvignon and 36% merlot) Bright medium ruby. Highly complex aromas of blackberry, violet pastille, eucalyptus, leather and game. Wonderfully sweet but with terrific grip, even a touch of youthful austerity. Very classy, subtle wine with terrific inner-mouth energy. Builds very slowly on the back half, finishing with noble, fine-grained tannins and terrific grip. This makes the 1995 seem almost cooked by comparison. Still needs at least five or six years of cellaring. |We always had unusual tastes in this wine, like eucalyptus and menthol, due to the cool September nights,| noted Ducasse.
    Author: Stephen Tanzer
    Issue: September/October 2004
  • Jancis Robinson | Rating: 16

    Bright youthful crimson. Scented. Very direct and youthful with marked acidity. This tastes as though the grapes were not as ripe as in most of the other 1996 St-Juliens tasted alongside it.
    Author: Jancis Robinson
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 90

    Enticing aromas of cinnamon and ripe fruit. Medium- to full-bodied, with ripe fruit flavors and a good fruit core. Medium tannins. St.-Julien's Lagrange seldom goes wrong, and this is certainly outstanding for the vintage. 24,000 cases made.
    Author: James Suckling
  • Wine Advocate | Rating: 90

    This impeccably run, Japanese-owned property has fashioned a superb 1996. Opaque purple-colored, with a backward yet promising nose of classically pure cassis intermixed with pain grille and spice, this medium to full-bodied, powerful yet stylish wine possesses superb purity, a nicely-layered feel in the mouth, and plenty of structure. It will not be an early-drinking St.-Julien, but one to lay away and enjoy over the next 2-3 decades.
    Author: Robert Parker
  • Self | Rating: 93

    Author: grapist
  • Self | Rating: 90

    Clear deep Garnet with brickish rim showing some age. Clean intense bouquet of blackberry and light spices. Dry palate of currant and cinnamon. Still very tannic and austere, tight. Don't know if this will ever mellow....almost astringent fruit and tannins combating, expected more flavor integration, serve with fatty/braised beef or aged hard cheese.
    Author: SurgPA05
  • Self | Rating:

    Sept. 2017 Seminar with Michael Meagher
    Author: CdB Boston
Believed to have once been home to an order of the Knights Templar in the 14th century, the Bordeaux chateau was acquired by Baron de Brane, of Mouton and Brane-Cantenac fame, before being turned over in the late 18th century to Napoleon's finance minister, who significantly expanded the vineyard. However, it wasn't until a century later that Lagrange wines achieved superior quality. The Cendoya family, who had owned the estate since 1925, sold it off to the Japanese wine and spirits conglomerate Suntory. Under government recommendation, Suntory spent $4 million on renovations ($10 million to date) under the supervision of winemaker Marcel Ducasse, former apprentice to Professor Peynaud.

The estate's second wine is called Les Fiefs de Lagrange.

See other similar producers:Chateau Montrose,Chateau Cos D'Estournel,Chateau Talbot
Located in the southwest of France, Bordeaux is the single largest fine-wine-producing region in the world, with more than 15,000 growers spread over 57 appellations and more than 700 million bottles produced annually. The region boasts a two-thousand-year winemaking history and some of the wine world's most recognized and highly sought-after names. Red Bordeaux blends comprise eighty percent of production, but dry and sweet whites are also well-known. The region is divided into the Left and Right Banks (of the Dordogne River); Cabernet Sauvignon prevails in the former and Merlot in the latter.

White Bordeaux blends are most commonly composed of Sémillon and Sauvignon Blanc, and come in a range of dry and sweet styles. Sémillon contributes body while Sauvignon Blanc adds high acidity, a characteristic that is particularly important in the sweet wines of Bordeaux.

Sauternes is one of the world’s most prestigious regions for sweet wine production, made possible by Sémillon’s affinity for noble rot. Wines from world-renowned Château d’Yquem are fermented and matured in new oak for up to three years and can age for decades in bottle. These wines display complex aromas of melon, honey, apricot, citrus peel, mango, and butterscotch and develop added complexity and aromas with age.

The best dry wines from this blend come from producers such as Château Haut-Brion, Château Pape Clément, and Domaine de Chevalier in Pessac-Léognan and Graves. These wines are typically fermented and matured in new oak and display a full-bodied richness with concentrated nutty flavors overlaying the fruit.

Due to its freshness and flavor profile, dry white Bordeaux blends pair well with almost any white food, including all types of fish, poultry, veal, and pork. The sweet wines of Bordeaux pair well with foie gras, oysters, blue cheese, spicy food (particularly Asian cuisines), any dish with sweet notes, and of course, dessert.

Collector Data For This Wine

  • 782 bottles owned
  • 131 collectors
  • Average collector rating: 92
    (Out of 131 collectors)