• Home
  • 1971 Château Haut-Brion

1971 Château Haut-Brion

FRANCE / BORDEAUX / PESSAC-LÉOGNAN
  • 84 WS
  • Variety
    Red Bordeaux Blend
See all wines from Château Haut-Brion

Out of stock

learn more about producers & collectors

SKU: 51621-1971-750

This item is available by the case only

Total:
$375.00

This is a final sale item

Not eligible for cancellations or refunds

  • Bordeaux Book(1998) | Rating: 88

    For me, the 1971 is the best Haut-Brion produced between 1966 and 1975. This fully mature 1971 has a sumptuous, sweet, ripe, earthy, richly fruity flavor, medium to full body, a big, full-intensity, spicy bouquet, and a silky, supple texture. This very stylish and delicious wine should be drunk up. Not retasted since 1982, but I suspect this wine should still be in fine condition.
    Author: Robert Parker
  • Wine Spectator | Rating: 84

    Light in texture, but nicely balanced to show off delicate cherry and smoke flavors. Harmonious, if not particularly complex.
    Author: Harvey Steiman
  • No collector reviews available
  • Since its founding in 1525, Chateau Haut-Brion has passed between many illustrious owners, including admirals, archbishops, and mayors of Bordeaux. In recent years, the estate has come under the ownership of Clarence Douglas Dillon, Ambassador of the United States in Paris and Minister of Finance under President John F. Kennedy, making it the only American-owned First Growth property. Currently, Dillon's granddaughter, the Duchesse de Mouchy, oversees Haut-Brion, among many others, under the public limited company of "Domaine Clarence Dillon."

    Chateau Haut-Brion is also the only First Growth property from the 1855 Classification that lies outside of the Medoc and Sauternes. Located in Pessac, within the Graves region, just one mile from the city of Bordeaux, the wine of Chateau Haut-Brion is highly sought-after, landing it among the most expensive and prestigious wines in France. The estate vineyards, dominated by gravel and clay, are planted to both red and white varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc; and Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc. Haut-Brion is characterized by earthy scents, ripe fruit, tobacco and mineral, revealing aromas of chocolate and smoke and creating an elegant and harmonious wine that is highly structured, allowing it to age seamlessly.

    See other similar producers:Chateau Latour,Chateau Montrose,Chateau Lafite Rothschild
    Located in the southwest of France, Bordeaux is the single largest fine-wine-producing region in the world, with more than 15,000 growers spread over 57 appellations and more than 700 million bottles produced annually. The region boasts a two-thousand-year winemaking history and some of the wine world's most recognized and highly sought-after names. Red Bordeaux blends comprise eighty percent of production, but dry and sweet whites are also well-known. The region is divided into the Left and Right Banks (of the Dordogne River); Cabernet Sauvignon prevails in the former and Merlot in the latter.

    White Bordeaux blends are most commonly composed of Sémillon and Sauvignon Blanc, and come in a range of dry and sweet styles. Sémillon contributes body while Sauvignon Blanc adds high acidity, a characteristic that is particularly important in the sweet wines of Bordeaux.

    Sauternes is one of the world’s most prestigious regions for sweet wine production, made possible by Sémillon’s affinity for noble rot. Wines from world-renowned Château d’Yquem are fermented and matured in new oak for up to three years and can age for decades in bottle. These wines display complex aromas of melon, honey, apricot, citrus peel, mango, and butterscotch and develop added complexity and aromas with age.

    The best dry wines from this blend come from producers such as Château Haut-Brion, Château Pape Clément, and Domaine de Chevalier in Pessac-Léognan and Graves. These wines are typically fermented and matured in new oak and display a full-bodied richness with concentrated nutty flavors overlaying the fruit.

    Due to its freshness and flavor profile, dry white Bordeaux blends pair well with almost any white food, including all types of fish, poultry, veal, and pork. The sweet wines of Bordeaux pair well with foie gras, oysters, blue cheese, spicy food (particularly Asian cuisines), any dish with sweet notes, and of course, dessert.

    Collector Data For This Wine

    • 65 bottles owned
    • 24 collectors